A Minger’s Tale Beginning’s, by R.B.N Bookmark.

Kindle Ready Front Cover - Kopia

The Author

……..In brief

Originally from Manchester, I left the damp north of England behind me and exiled myself to the frozen north of Scandinavia instead where I have remained these last 25 years.

My writing started 3 years ago after a long hiatus.  Urged on by family and friends

A Minger`s Tale-Beginnings eventually saw the light of day in March 2016.

The books quirky humor while portraying the flipside of life during the 1970 to the mid 1980`s has endeared itself to readers on Goodreads, Amazon aswell the bloggers of Tometender and Tickmick. Both of whom have featured and reviewed it.

In 2015 I entered a rough outline of Halfway to Manchurias first chapter as a short story to The Shelagh Delaney Writing Competition. Although it did not win it did reach the second tier of the competition and will be published as part of an anthology later this year.

 

Bookmark

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004808312146&sk=about&section=work

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DJAXURM

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29597167-a-minger-s-tale

http://tometender.blogspot.se/2016/05/a-mingers-tale-beginnings-by-rbn.html?zx=958f8d1e0ff51963

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase

Due to my Americanism, until I opened the book, I didn’t know what a minger was. According to the author, a minger is British slang for a male or female who fell out of the ugly tree at birth and hit every branch on the way down. The author is a minger.

Lacking confidence in himself, or maybe he blatantly excepts the fact that he truly is a minger, the author recounts his life’s ups and downs…mostly the downs but with every down, he shines a light. “I never thought I’d make it this far in life and that happy endings do exist…From an early age, I realized I was never destined for great things. The world would not be given to me on a stick, and the only silver spoon I would ever see would be a bag of sugar by that name.”

Absolutely hilarious read. Pure British comedy thrown with some Irish in there as well. Growing up with Irish immigrant parents, he describes times in the 60s and 70s in Manchester. He writes the book as ‘diary style’ and recounts the many memories he has growing up and why he became the person he is today.

A constant reminder that life shouldn’t be taken too seriously, and we all need to relax and just enjoy. Very entertaining and I highly recommend this book if you enjoy good ‘ol English humor.

Format: Paperback

Even from the title you get an idea that this book leans on the side of deadpan during an underdog story, in essence it is a deliciously honest and positively told autobiography lit by hilarious anecdotes and dazzling insight. A Minger’s tale is an insight into the frustratingly mundane and difficult side of the trials of one man desperately seeking improvement through tough times on the breadline of England 1970s.

Wittily written, punctuated with a great narrative style, Ribban’s story begins at childhood and takes us through his various jobs and travel in the search for meaningful work… and meaning overall. It is amazing to see that this is Bookmark’s first book, there is undoubtedly much more to come, and after reading this awesome first book I’ll be the first in line.

I currently read a lot and so it’s even more rewarding when you chance upon a book that is not only entertaining but has some true belly-laugh moments in there too, I raced through this book and was both happy to finish it for the enjoyment it gave, and sad that I now have to wait for the next instalment from Bookmark – he has at least one lifelong fan. The fact that this is the first review makes me think I am both privileged and frustrated that more people haven’t read this yet!

Bookmark’s hardships and hilarity are great tales for everyone to identify with, each chapter gives a fresh anecdote of the next challenge he faces. My particular favourite was hearing about his months working at the hotel in Cornwall, I have faced similar episodes and so it was brilliant to hear how someone else copes with the randomness of events, and how they deal with tricky characters and awkward situations.Read more ›

Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report abuse

Format: Paperback

Authentic, working class, and a collage of episodes which go into the making of a child, adolescent and adult, “ A Minger’s Tale : Beginnings…” by R.B.N. Bookmark is one of those autobiographical novels which may well enable future sociologists to map out a change in terrain in which the revolution in publishing helps writers like Bookmark to tell his tale, a tale reminiscent of other tales and a title which for me anyway echoes the grandfather of English poetry, Chaucer, and his tales.
Early on the reader learns who and what a minger is, and the tale that follows portrays growing up in the north of England, getting schooled in the north of England, footballing in the north of England, and being unemployed in the north of England! The collage is massively detailed and full of memories evoked with such minutiae that the reader is left in no doubt of the writer’s authenticity and power of recall. Replete with puns (which I personally found inappropriate in that they changed the tone of the narrative and made me too present in an ordinary conversation in which guys and gals poor-pun to gain attention), the book nevertheless covers a big number of years, those that begin a life, a life that struggles to aspire and is only too well aware of failure while simultaneously succeeding (later on) by getting itself written!
The writer is not just there to build up these impressions and collage collages on collages. He is there to shape matters to make sense of it all. He is there to print his record which he has done, to publish a book, his book, which he has done.
All writers try to write with passion and commitment (or if they don’t, then maybe they should!) and R.B.N. Bookmark is committed and passionate. It may be that his episodes could be trimmed a bit to make for greater punch.

Format: Kindle Edition

A very good portrait of life in a hard-pressed area of England during the seventies. We follow our hero through his childhood and teenage struggle, and learn a lot about the deprivation and despair, that blighted much of society in those days (not that this doesn’t still somewhat afflict us today).
It shows how deprivation, sense of inadequacy and lack of ambition can affect a young mind and bring lack of self-worth. In this it’s a telling document, as we follow the author through his early years – brutalised by a Catholic education, and battling against the trappings of his surrounds.
He’s clearly a likeable character, and the way he describes his interactions with his teachers/mates/employers and how he tries to escape through things lie football is entertaining.
At times the humour is a trifle coarse, which might put off the more delicate reader, and the book is peppered by clichés, such as ‘no way Jose’ or ‘you could cut it with a knife’– but it’s very much that type of book, and therein lies the charm.
Apart from the occasional corniness, the book is well written with a lot of skilfully handled dialogue, but above all, the book paints an illuminating picture of a section of England. It may not have the insight or the human interplay shown in books such as Angela’s Ashes, but there is a raw warmth in it that makes for an enjoyable read.

2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?

Anthony Stancomb

A very good portrait of life in a hard-pressed area of England during the seventies. We follow our hero through his childhood and teenage struggle, and learn a lot about the deprivation and despair, that blighted much of society in those days (not that this doesn’t still somewhat afflict us today).
It shows how deprivation, sense of inadequacy and lack of ambition can affect a young mind and bring lack of self-worth. In this it’s a telling document, as we follow the author through his early years – brutalised by a Catholic education, and battling against the trappings of his surrounds.
He’s clearly a likeable character, and the way he describes his interactions with his teachers/mates/employers and how he tries to escape through things lie football is entertaining.
At times the humour is a trifle coarse, which might put off the more delicate reader, and the book is peppered by clichés, such as ‘no way Jose’ or ‘you could cut it with a knife’– but it’s very much that type of book, and therein lies the charm.
Apart from the occasional corniness, the book is well written with a lot of skilfully handled dialogue, but above all, the book paints an illuminating picture of a section of England. It may not have the insight or the human interplay shown in books such as Angela’s Ashes, but there is a raw warmth in it that makes for an enjoyable read
John Findley

May 06, 2016 John Findley rated it really liked it;

A very good portrait of life in a hard-pressed area of England during the seventies. We follow our hero through his childhood and teenage struggle, and learn a lot about the deprivation and despair, that blighted much of society in those days (not that this doesn’t still somewhat afflict us today).
It shows how deprivation, sense of inadequacy and lack of ambition can affect a young mind and bring lack of self-worth. In this it’s a telling document, as we follow the author through his early years – brutalised by a Catholic education, and battling against the trappings of his surrounds.
He’s clearly a likeable character, and the way he describes his interactions with his teachers/mates/employers and how he tries to escape through things lie football is entertaining.
At times the humour is a trifle coarse, which might put off the more delicate reader, and the book is peppered by clichés, such as ‘no way Jose’ or ‘you could cut it with a knife’– but it’s very much that type of book, and therein lies the charm.
Apart from the occasional corniness, the book is well written with a lot of skilfully handled dialogue, but above all, the book paints an illuminating picture of a section of England. It may not have the insight or the human interplay shown in books such as Angela’s Ashes, but there is a raw warmth in it that makes for an enjoyable read

Martin Skate

A delicious cocktail of hilarious underdog triumphs!

Even from the title you get an idea that this book leans on the side of deadpan during an underdog story, in essence it is a deliciously honest and positively told autobiography lit by hilarious anecdotes and dazzling insight. A Minger’s tale is an insight into the frustratingly mundane and difficult side of the trials of one man desperately seeking improvement through tough times on the breadline of England 1970s.

Wittily written, punctuated with a great narrative style, Ribban’s story begins at childhood and takes us through his various jobs and travel in the search for meaningful work… and meaning overall. It is amazing to see that this is Bookmark’s first book, there is undoubtedly much more to come, and after reading this awesome first book I’ll be the first in line.

I currently read a lot and so it’s even more rewarding when you chance upon a book that is not only entertaining but has some true belly-laugh moments in there too, I raced through this book and was both happy to finish it for the enjoyment it gave, and sad that I now have to wait for the next instalment from Bookmark – he has at least one lifelong fan. The fact that this is the first review makes me think I am both privileged and frustrated that more people haven’t read this yet!

Bookmark’s hardships and hilarity are great tales for everyone to identify with, each chapter gives a fresh anecdote of the next challenge he faces. My particular favourite was hearing about his months working at the hotel in Cornwall, I have faced similar episodes and so it was brilliant to hear how someone else copes with the randomness of events, and how they deal with tricky characters and awkward situations. If you’ve worked in a factory, tried to better yourself against the odds, struggled for work, or are simply interested in the social political situation of England 1970s then this book is a must, it will make you smile, it will make it all seem not so bad after all.

A Minger’s tale is an honest account, from an honest gentleman, who has lived. I guarantee this is a star who will shine bright in the near future. Congrats Ribban Bookmark, and thanks!

Kindle Ready Front Cover 2

Advertisements

One thought on “A Minger’s Tale Beginning’s, by R.B.N Bookmark.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s